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Virtual Speakers Bureau

HEFNU's Virtual Speakers Bureau connects college and university professors who teach virtual, hybrid or in-person classes on the Holocaust with Holocaust scholars. The Virtual Speakers Bureau features scholars from an array of disciplines and from around the globe. Speakers will prepare a tailor-made lecture or classroom session in their area of expertise. The focus is on effective classroom engagement and learning.

Interested professors should contact potential speakers directly. We leave it to classroom professors and their invited speakers to discuss the visit: the goals of the course and how the speaker can enhance student learning.

HEFNU recommends an honorarium of $250 to recognize the time and effort of the “visiting” scholar.

Hosting professors may apply for a need-based Honorarium Grant by sending the following items at least two weeks before the event, to hef@northwestern.edu: 

1) Lecture title, visiting professor, and date; 2) your name and insitutional affiliation; 3) a statement of need; and 4) "evidence" of need (eg, letter from chair or dean)

 

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Alexander Alvarez, Northern Arizona University, Criminology & Criminal Justice

Alexander Alvarez, Northern Arizona University, Criminology & Criminal Justice

Climate Change and the ways in which it will increasingly heighten the risk for violent conflict, including genocide; Native American history and the varied ways in which genocide was carried out, including policies intended to carry out cultural genocide; Comparative approaches to understanding the etiology and dynamics of genocide; Anti-Semitism, both historical patterns and contemporary trends

alex.alvarez@nau.edu

Lawrence Baron, San Diego State University, History

Lawrence Baron, San Diego State University, History

The Dynamics of Decency: Why Righteous Gentiles Rescued Jews; Hollywood and the Holocaust: From Appeasement to Anti-Nazism, 1933–1945; Not in Kansas Anymore: Holocaust Movies for Children; Serious Humor: Holocaust Comedy Films; Statuettes of Limitations: The Oscars and the Holocaust, 1945-1960.

lbaron@sdsu.edu

Danny M. Cohen, Northwestern University, Education

Danny M. Cohen, Northwestern University, Education

The Accidental Holocaust Novelist; Ghosts of Auschwitz: hidden stories of my grandfather's past; Overlapping Triangles & Common Graves: Integrating non-Jewish victims of Nazism; Choose-Your-Own Holocaust WebQuest: careful gamification of Holocaust pedagogies; Holocaust Analogies: Exploring the limits and necessities of ‘Never Again.'

dannymcohen@northwestern.edu

Beth Cohen, California State University, Jewish Studies

Beth Cohen, California State University, Jewish Studies

War Orphans Find Home: Child Survivors Early Postwar Experiences; The Postwar Reception of Holocaust Survivors by the American Jewish Community; Reconstituted Survivor Families After the Holocaust; From Oral History to Testimony: Reconstructing Survivors’ First Years in America; Ultraorthodox Postwar Aid to Child Survivors: Gendered Efforts; The Current State of Holocaust Museums and Education

bcohen@csun.edu

Ovidiu Creanga, Claims Conference, History & Religious Studies

Ovidiu Creanga, Claims Conference, History & Religious Studies

Holocaust Restitution and Compensation: The Luxembourg Agreement; The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference): A Brief History (1952-present); History of Claims Conference Compensation Programs (one or more individual programs); Open Ghettos in Romania: A Compensation and Historiographical Exploration; The Fate of the Jews, Roma/Sinti, POWs, and Religious Minorities During the Holocaust in Romania (an individual or comparative perspective)

ovidiu.creanga@claimscon.org

Imogen Dalziel, Holocaust and Genocide Research Partnership/Holocaust Research Institute, Royal Holloway, University of London/Independent Scholar and Freelance Educator, History

Imogen Dalziel, Holocaust and Genocide Research Partnership/Holocaust Research Institute, Royal Holloway, University of London/Independent Scholar and Freelance Educator, History

Holocaust tourism; Digital Holocaust memory; Holocaust museums’ use of social media; The institution-visitor relationship at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum

idalziel@wienerholocaustlibrary.org

Simone Gigliotti, Royal Holloway, University of London, History

Simone Gigliotti, Royal Holloway, University of London, History

Captives of a hidden Holocaust: Trains, train journeys, and their interpretations; Arrivals, Departures, and Absences reclaimed: train platforms and material dis/integration in European Holocaust memory culture; Children of the Stone Wilderness: David “Chim” Seymour’s European odyssey of 1948; Geo-histories and Holocaust mobilities: Digital curations and discovery with StoryMaps

simone.gigliotti@rhul.ac.uk

Emmanuel Kahan, National University of La Plata, Sociology, Cultural Diversity

Emmanuel Kahan, National University of La Plata, Sociology, Cultural Diversity

Holocaust Memory on Marginal Sites; The Latin American case; Global, Transnational, National and Local environments; Uses of the past: Historia, Memory, Distortion and Denial. Lectures given in SPANISH.

emmanuel.kahan@gmail.com

Phyllis Lassner, Northwestern University, Women's Studies, Jewish Studies, and Writing, Emerita

Phyllis Lassner, Northwestern University, Women's Studies, Jewish Studies, and Writing, Emerita

Remembering the Kindertransport; Women’s Holocaust Voices: Gisella Perl and Charlotte Delbo; Jewish Boyhood in Holocaust Film; The Art of Holocaust Lamentation”: Images of Memorialization; Holocaust Literature and Film for Young Adults; Representing the Holocaust in Popular Fiction: Sara Paretsky’s "Total Recall and Critical Mass"

phyllisl@northwestern.edu

Alexandra Lohse, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, German History

Alexandra Lohse, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, German History

Nazi Camp Universe. (Donations accepted to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in lieu of honorarium.)

alohse@ushmm.org

Ingrid Lewis, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Film Studies

Ingrid Lewis, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Film Studies

European Holocaust Films; The Representation of Women as Victims in Holocaust Films; Women Filmmakers in Twenty-First-Century Holocaust Cinema; Cinematic Representations of Female Perpetrators; Gendering Heroism: The Role of Women in Filmic Discourses About Resistance; Holocaust Films in France: Between History and Cinematic Memory

Ingrid.lewis@dkit.ie

George Mastroianni, U.S. Air Force Academy/Pennsylvania State University, World Campus, Psychology, Emeritus

George Mastroianni, U.S. Air Force Academy/Pennsylvania State University, World Campus, Psychology, Emeritus

Social-psychological explanations of perpetrator behavior; Psychology of memory as it pertains to testimony; Clinical perspectives on National Socialism and its varying effects on adults and youth. Questions of normalcy and psychopathology in Germany during the Nazi era.

Grm17@psu.edu

Jürgen Matthäus, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, History

Jürgen Matthäus, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, History

German agency and the Europe-wide Holocaust project; Nazi antisemitism-ideology and practice; German WWII photo-albums-violence and images of “the East”; Jewish perceptions of the “Final Solution;” Ideological indoctrination in the SS- and police corps. In lieu of honorarium, you may donate to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum at ushmm.org.

jmatthaus@ushmm.org

Erin McGlothlin, Washington University in St. Louis, German & Jewish Studies

Erin McGlothlin, Washington University in St. Louis, German & Jewish Studies

Holocaust literature; representation of Holocaust perpetrators; ethical issues in Holocaust representation; generational writing on the Holocaust; cognitive and affective approaches to the Holocaust; literary representation of Operation Reinhard; children in the Third Reich, the Holocaust and WWII; Claude Lanzmann's "Shoah;" Art Spiegelman's "Maus"; Ruth Klüger's "Still Alive"

mcglothlin@wustl.edu

Katarzyna Person, Jewish Historical Institute, History

Katarzyna Person, Jewish Historical Institute, History

Underground Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto and the difficulty of listening to the voices of the victims; Gender-specific violence in the ghettos during the Holocaust; Jewish honor courts and the search for retribution in the postwar world; Early research on the Holocaust and the attempts at re-building of the Jewish community in Poland

kperson@jhi.pl

Alan Rosen, Yad Vashem, Literature and Religion

Alan Rosen, Yad Vashem, Literature and Religion

To Capture the Fire: The Life and Works of Elie Wiesel; Literary Responses to the Holocaust; The History and Meaning of Interviewing Holocaust Survivors; Keeping Time Sacred, Making Time Holy: The Holocaust’s Jewish Calendars; Out of the Depths: Religious Jewish Life and Practice During and After the Holocaust.

acrosen@gmail.com

John Roth, Claremont McKenna College, Philosophy Emeritus

John Roth, Claremont McKenna College, Philosophy Emeritus

What insights do Holocaust scholars/survivors-Primo Levi and Charlotte Delbo, Raul Hilberg and Sarah Kofman, Elie Wiesel and Jean Améry-offer today? Why do we study the Holocaust in a world wracked by antisemitism, immigration and refugee crises, human rights abuses, environmental degradation, and the COVID-19 pandemic? What happened to ethics during and after the Holocaust? What have we learned from the Holocaust? How do we understand the Holocaust if at the end of the day, the void, the abyss, nothingness (call it what you will) consume and prevail?

jroth@cmc.edu

Vladimir Solonari, University of Central Florida, History

Vladimir Solonari, University of Central Florida, History

Romanian Nationalism and the Persecution of Jews; How Final was Romanian "Final Solution"?: Understanding Aims and Dynamics of Romanian Persecution of Jews; Were Perpetrators Moral Beings? Murder of Jews Through the Eyes of By-Standers; Popular Antisemitism and the Murder of Jews, or How Anti-Semitic Were the Local Perpetrators?; On the Legal Conscientiousness of Romanian Perpetrators, or How "Legal" Was the Holocaust?

vladimir.solonari@ucf.edu

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