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Virtual Speakers Bureau

HEFNU's Virtual Speakers Bureau connects college and university professors who teach virtual or hybrid classes on the Holocaust with Holocaust scholars. The Virtual Speakers Bureau features scholars from an array of disciplines and from around the globe. Speakers will prepare a tailor-made lecture or classroom session in their area of expertise. The focus is on effective classroom engagement and learning.

Interested professors should contact potential speakers directly. We leave it to classroom professors and their invited speakers to discuss the visit: the goals of the course and how the speaker can enhance student learning.

HEFNU recommends an honorarium of $250 to recognize the time and effort of the “visiting” scholar.

Hosting professors may apply for a need-based Honorarium Grant by sending the following items at least two weeks before the event, to hef@northwestern.edu: 

1) Lecture title, visiting professor, and date; 2) your name and insitutional affiliation; 3) a statement of need; and 4) "evidence" of need (eg, letter from chair or dean)

 

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Lawrence Baron, San Diego State University, History

Lawrence Baron, San Diego State University, History

The Dynamics of Decency: Why Righteous Gentiles Rescued Jews; Hollywood and the Holocaust: From Appeasement to Anti-Nazism, 1933–1945; Not in Kansas Anymore: Holocaust Movies for Children; Serious Humor: Holocaust Comedy Films; Statuettes of Limitations: The Oscars and the Holocaust, 1945-1960.

lbaron@sdsu.edu

Danny M. Cohen, Northwestern University, Education

Danny M. Cohen, Northwestern University, Education

The Accidental Holocaust Novelist; Ghosts of Auschwitz: hidden stories of my grandfather's past; Overlapping Triangles & Common Graves: Integrating non-Jewish victims of Nazism; Choose-Your-Own Holocaust WebQuest: careful gamification of Holocaust pedagogies; Holocaust Analogies: Exploring the limits and necessities of ‘Never Again.'

dannymcohen@northwestern.edu

Emmanuel Kahan, National University of La Plata, Sociology, Cultural Diversity

Emmanuel Kahan, National University of La Plata, Sociology, Cultural Diversity

Holocaust Memory on Marginal Sites; The Latin American case; Global, Transnational, National and Local environments; Uses of the past: Historia, Memory, Distortion and Denial. Lectures given in SPANISH.

emmanuel.kahan@gmail.com

Alexandra Lohse, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, German History

Alexandra Lohse, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, German History

Nazi Camp Universe. (Donations accepted to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in lieu of honorarium.)

alohse@ushmm.org

George Mastroianni, U.S. Air Force Academy/Pennsylvania State University, World Campus, Psychology, Emeritus

George Mastroianni, U.S. Air Force Academy/Pennsylvania State University, World Campus, Psychology, Emeritus

Social-psychological explanations of perpetrator behavior; Psychology of memory as it pertains to testimony; Clinical perspectives on National Socialism and its varying effects on adults and youth. Questions of normalcy and psychopathology in Germany during the Nazi era.

Grm17@psu.edu

Jürgen Matthäus, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, History

Jürgen Matthäus, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, History

German agency and the Europe-wide Holocaust project; Nazi antisemitism-ideology and practice; German WWII photo-albums-violence and images of “the East”; Jewish perceptions of the “Final Solution;” Ideological indoctrination in the SS- and police corps. In lieu of honorarium, you may donate to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum at ushmm.org.

jmatthaus@ushmm.org

Alan Rosen, Yad Vashem, Literature and Religion

Alan Rosen, Yad Vashem, Literature and Religion

To Capture the Fire: The Life and Works of Elie Wiesel; Literary Responses to the Holocaust; The History and Meaning of Interviewing Holocaust Survivors; Keeping Time Sacred, Making Time Holy: The Holocaust’s Jewish Calendars; Out of the Depths: Religious Jewish Life and Practice During and After the Holocaust.

acrosen@gmail.com

John Roth, Claremont McKenna College, Philosophy Emeritus

John Roth, Claremont McKenna College, Philosophy Emeritus

What insights do Holocaust scholars/survivors-Primo Levi and Charlotte Delbo, Raul Hilberg and Sarah Kofman, Elie Wiesel and Jean Améry-offer today? Why do we study the Holocaust in a world wracked by antisemitism, immigration and refugee crises, human rights abuses, environmental degradation, and the COVID-19 pandemic? What happened to ethics during and after the Holocaust? What have we learned from the Holocaust? How do we understand the Holocaust if at the end of the day, the void, the abyss, nothingness (call it what you will) consume and prevail?

jroth@cmc.edu

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